User Profile

Nibsy

Nibsy@bookrastinating.com

Joined 3 weeks, 3 days ago

My reading interests are broad and mostly non-fiction. I typically stick to topics related to nature, the environment, and science in general. However, lately I've taken an interest in cultural anthropology, history, and the sociological factors that are driving a growing mistrust in science, scientists, and scientific institutions. I have a couple of other accounts in the fediverse, which I've joined recently. But, as a reader (and recovering GR user), this little nook of the fediverse looked particularly interesting to me.

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2022 Reading Goal

Success! Nibsy has read 31 of 30 books.

User Activity

finished reading The Writer's Process by Anne Janzer

The Writer's Process (Paperback, 2016, Cuesta Park Consulting) 4 stars

Writing a book takes an enormous amount time time, energy, emotional involvement, and dedication, which is why so many aspiring authors fail. The Writer's Process is an attempt by Anne Janzer, an award-winning nonfiction author, to equip aspiring writers with a basic neurological understanding of how the brain works in the creative process, so we can defend against our own self-sabotage and harness our own brain power power to become successful published authors.

The book is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the cognitive processes that affect writing. This is not a neuroscience textbook. It's a topical overview of the neurological processes that contribute to creativity and those that can lead to failure. Janzer breaks down these complex processes to the activities of the Scribe and the Muse. The Scribe is all business. It sets deadlines, does the hard work of writing, and attends to the technical …

An Immense World (Hardcover, 2022, Penguin Random House) 5 stars

The Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and …

I spent an entire career measuring electrical activity in fish nostrils and monitoring their behavioural responses to smells. Looking forward to digging into this book!

reviewed Write for Your Life by Anna Quindlen

Write for Your Life (Hardcover, 2022, Random House) 5 stars

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • In this clarion call to pick up a pen and find yourself …

Read it for the writing

5 stars

It doesn't happen often, but every once in a while a book leaps out of nowhere, takes you by surprise, and changes you. Write For Your Life by Pulitzer Prize winning author Anna Quindlen is one such book. After reading it, I've come to realize that my favourite books are those about writing written masterfully by a literary artist; books like Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott, or How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. There are many reasons to read this book. But read it for the writing. The eloquence alone is enough.

In many ways, this is an author's plea for everyday people to pick up their pens and write about their normal, ordinary lives; to preserve a snapshot of the writer in their particular time and place. The simple act of note-taking can offer a glimpse of history that would otherwise be lost …

finished reading Einstein's dreams by Alan P. Lightman

Einstein's dreams (1994, Warner Books) 4 stars

Everyone experiences the vagaries of time; the sudden feeling of deja vu, the sense that years pass by faster with age, or the unnoticed passage of time when we enter the state of flow. Time is ephemeral and its true nature is hard to define. One of Einstein's great achievements was to demonstrate that time and space are inextricably linked and neither could exist without the other.

But this was not a book about the physical nature of time. It was a collection of short vignettes, beautifully written, that served as representations of Einstein's dreams about time. Each vignette imagined a different kind of time. In one dream, time flowed like a stream. Most of it moved in one direction. But occasionally, a rivulet of time would back eddy and people from the future could visit the past. In another vignette, time is imagined as being rigid, where the past, …