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KennyKravitz

KennyKravitz@bookrastinating.com

Joined 1 year, 3 months ago

Chronic bookrastinator thanks to ADHD. Mostly SF & Fantasy.

Sheffield, UK

Mastodon: @kennykravitz@mindly.social

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KennyKravitz's books

Currently Reading (View all 6)

reviewed Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer (The Southern Reach Trilogy)

Jeff VanderMeer: Acceptance (2014, Macmillan) 4 stars

Acceptance is a 2014 novel by Jeff VanderMeer. It is the last in a series …

A satisfying, if confusing, concluding chapter.

5 stars

Content warning Spoilers for Annihlation and Authority

Lionel Shriver: We Need to Talk About Kevin (2006, Harper Perennial) 4 stars

An intense, and intensely thought-provoking, read.

5 stars

Content warning Hard not to spoil this one, so the review assumes you have read the book already.

Gav Thorpe: Path of the Outcast (Path of the Eldar #3) (2012) 4 stars

A whole new world, a thrilling chase, a wonderous place...for naughty space elves.

4 stars

The concluding part of the Path of the Eldar trilogy benefits from having by far the most interesting range of locales and events. Thorpe closes the overarching story arc quite well, with a somewhat open and satisfyingly Eldarish ending. Like the first book, this one suffers from the PoV character being overall rather whiny, sulky and foppish (although thankfully not as self-regarding as Korlandril). This results in what is really the story's Achilles Heel - it's hard to imagine anyone taking Aradryan seriously enough to allow him to do a lot of the things he ends up doing. If the story slowed down and stopped thrusting the reader into one eerily fascinating world after another, they might pick holes in the unlikeliness of Aradryan's ascent to the point where the whole think collapses. I managed to avoid that, but YMMV.

Gav Thorpe: Path of the Seer
            
                Warhammer 40000 Novels Path of the Eldar (2011, Games Workshop) 4 stars

Another facet of Aeldari life explored

4 stars

This book continues on the same vein as its predecessor, being set largely on Alaitoc, but this time Gav fleshes out the life of Eldar seers and in particular, just how their powers of foresight work thanks to 'the skein'. It's all plausible enough, within the context of 40k and the story, which overlaps with both the first and third books, serves to anchor the trilogy's entire narrative arc. Perhaps as a consequence of that, the story itself feels a bit less eventful than the other two but the book benefits from Thirianna being a far, far less self-centred and irritating protagonist than her two friends that narrate the other books.

Аркадий Натанович Стругацкий, Arkady and Boris Strugatsky: Roadside Picnic (2000) 4 stars

A troubled man leads a writer and a scientist into "The Zone", a mysterious area …

I don't know what I was expecting...but it wasn't this

5 stars

I picked this up based on the media that has been influenced by it, like the Tarkovsky film, the STALKER games, Metro 2033, Tales of the Loop etc. Usually when you move from the influences and adaptations and return to the source work, you find a tighter and more concentrated version of what came after but with Roadside Picnic almost the opposite is true. Having consumed quite a bit of media that borrow from the tense, otherworldly horror of RP's Zone sections I was unprepared for the breadth of the book. I didn't expect it to, by turns, become a Noirish thriller, a jet black comedy, and a philosphilical treatise on human nature and capitalism.

It seems to me that this should be on every SF enthusiast's 'required reading' list but it doesn't seem like many people bother to read it and that's a huge shame. Especially because it says …

Adam Croft: On Borrowed Time 3 stars

Enjoyabla rural crime drama

3 stars

Another solid outing in this series. I found the mystery a bit too easy to unpick this time around but Caroline Hills is a pleasing main character as she tries to balance the demands of illness, family life, leading a small team and trying to keep EMSOU off her back. I do wonder whether the incidental details would hold as much interest to someone who didn't grow up in the area these books are set ("I received my first handjob in those woods!" he cried), though.